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Search results for string : "Spy Hunter" (max. 100 records)

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   Titles: 11

PublisherTitlePlatformYearRatingISV
MidwaySpy HunterXbox 2002I
SunsoftSpy HunterNintendo NES1987I4
Bally MidwaySpy HunterNintendo GameCube2002I
AmsoftSpy HunterAmstrad CPC1986I4
U.S. Gold LtdSpy HunterAcorn BBC1983I
Bally MidwaySpy HunterCommodore 641983I5V
U.S. Gold LtdSpy HunterSinclair ZX Spectrum1985I5V
U.S. Gold LtdSpy HunterApple 2e1983
MidwaySpy Hunter 2Xbox 2003I
MidwaySpy Hunter: Nowhere to RunXbox 2006I
SunflowersSuper Spy HunterNintendo NES1992I

Spy Hunter is a 1983 arcade game developed and released by Bally Midway.
It has been ported to DOS, Nintendo NES, Amstrad CPC, Atari 2600, the Atari 8-bit family, BBC Micro, ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, Apple II family, ColecoVision, and more recently to some mobile phone platforms and the Palm PDA.

As a cabinet-style arcade game, Spy Hunter was produced in both sit-down and standard upright versions with the latter being more common. The game's controls consist of a steering wheel in the form of a futuristic aircraft-style yoke with several special-purpose buttons, a two-position stick shift (offering 'low' and 'high' gears), and a pedal used for acceleration. It is a single-player game.

The original Spy Hunter was followed by an arcade sequel, Spy Hunter II in 1987. It retained the Peter Gunn music and incorporated a cooperative two-player mode, but the top-down view was replaced with a more 3D perspective from behind and above the car. Though seemingly more realistic, the different perspective was unpopular and clumsy. The game achieved little success and remained largely unknown as it never went into large scale production.

The Nintendo port of this game has extremely buggy collision detection. If the road turns, the car will not crash if it remains pointed straight. It is possible to drive for hours over dirt, rocks, river banks, etc. If the car's tires are slashed while near the top of the screen, the car will often spin off the top of the screen and reappear at the bottom. The car becomes indestructible and can drive anywhere on the screen without being damaged, but the car's weapons no longer function. The Commodore 64 and Atari 8-bit versions had a similar apparent bug. Immediately after starting (being dropped off by the Van), one could continue driving on the side of the road without any enemy cars being able to damage the spy car. In the C64 and Atari 8-bit ports one could even drive further out on the black border on the side of the screen.




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